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NLV_Presents

Nina Las Vegas on Emojis, Australian talent & her upcoming NLV Presents Tour

NLV_Presents

It’s been a massive year for DJ and radio-broadcaster Nina Las Vegas, who has spent the past 18 months touring and working with the likes of Pharrell, Baauer, Ta-Ku, Motez, Wave Raver, Flight Facilities and What So Not (just to name a few). Also playing at some of Australia’s biggest festivals in addition to presenting Triple J’s Mix Up Exclusives, you’d expect that Nina has no time for anything else. Quite the opposite, actually. 

Succeeding her sell-out inaugural tour in February, Nina Las Vegas has announced another instalment, this time focusing on representing international acts in her aptly-named NLV Presents Tour – International EditionFeaturing global up-and-comers, Eclair Fifi (LuckyMe -UK)Sam Tiba (Bromance – FR), UNiiQU3 (USA) and special guest SWICK (Mad Decent  – AUS), the Sydney DJ and Twitter aficionado is pulling out all the stops to bring another throng of successful shows across Australia. 

Nina took some time out of her busy schedule to answer a few questions and to create an Emoji-inspired playlist for us. 

What made you switch from promoting local talent to international talent?

After travelling for 3 months early this year, I got an insight into the rest of the world’s club scene. Australian’s dance music history is only just beginning, where European countries like France and England have been at it for years. Yeah, we’re killing it, but we need to experience different sounds, different acts and different vibes if we want the scene to grow.

I chose to book international acts that the Australian acts I care about look up to. People like Eclair Fifi and Sam Tiba have been in the game for years and play some of the most exciting music you’ll ever hear. It’s pretty easy to do the same thing hear in Australia, play the same set… I wanted to move forward and take a bit of a risk.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/eclairfifi/eclairfifitriplej[/soundcloud]

Which Australian artists have you enjoyed watching going up the ranks the most?

Seeing What So Not (especially Emoh Instead) tour so hard in America is amazing. Obviously being at some of Flume and Wavey’s first Australian shows is wild too.

I can’t wait to see people finally catch on to the crazy talent that is Melbourne producer Swick and also I have this sneaky feeling that Tkay Maidza is going to be huge in a matter of months. 

How did you choose the four artists for the tour?

Each of these acts I look up to for different reasons. Eclair’s taste is never bad, Uniiqu3’s production can be heard in almost every one of my club sets, Sam Tiba is one of the best DJs you’ll ever see and Swick, well I just mentioned he’s the best.

To many people it seems like you have the dream job. What would you say your job description is?

OMG, it’s freaking hard. I jam about 7 days worth of work into 3 days at triple j. I am writing music at the moment too (!!!) which is taking up every other moment… oh and touring. I don’t sleep.

Emoji-inspired playlist

mouth1

“Anything by the Rolling Stones!” 

monkey

“Arctic Monkeys’ Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High” 

alien

“Anything by Skrillex!”


bunny“Dubbel Dutch’s Dip So

suss

“Something sexy and naughty! ‘Anaconda by’ Nicki Minaj” 

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/the-in-terns/sets/emoji-playlist[/soundcloud]

NLV Presents | International Edition dates 
FRI 10 OCT – Villa, Perth, WA tickets via Moshtix 
SAT 11 OCT – The Hi-Fi, Melbourne, VIC tickets via Oztix 
SUN 12 OCT – Zhivago, Adelaide, SA tickets on door
THU 16 OCT – Helm Bar, Sunshine Coast, QLD tickets on door*
FRI 17 OCT – Meanwhile at The Imperial, Sydney, NSW tickets via Oztix
SAT 18 OCT – The TBC Club, Brisbane QLD tickets via Moshtix
likeus
banoffee2

Banoffee: “I’m very much an internet artist”

Banoffee

Banoffee is Melbourne artist Martha Brown’s first solo project, after coming from the band, Otouto. Beginning as a bedroom project, Brown wrote personal songs she never saw going anywhere outside her bedroom walls. Now she’s gearing up to release a five-track EP with those songs and a little bit of help from fellow Melbournite, Oscar Key Sung.

As such, the EP meshes together delicate and personal songwriting with an RnB sensibility often straying into areas of electronica. Got It cleverly depicts two narratives with Brown dueting alongside a vocally manipulated male while Let’s Go To The Beach sees her embrace a deep-house instrumental. The rest of the EP sits in between those two with Brown’s organic voice and honest lyrics always in the spotlight.

We spoke to Banoffee ahead of her East Coast EP tour which kicks off at Brisbane’s BIGSOUND conference.

How did Banoffee come to be?

Banoffee started a few years ago when a band I was in called Otouto started to come to an end and I wanted to continue to play music. I wanted to start making music for me. It was a project to keep me entertained at the start. I wasn’t really sure I would release it. Alot of people have commented on it being quite an honest release. Alot of the songs are very personal to me. They were made in my bedroom for my own comfort at the time. I guess I kept making songs and started recording things and when people started showing interest I thought “oh hey, maybe I could make this a proper project”. And that’s where it started from there.

Are you finding it interesting to come from a band to do everything like shows and press by youself?

I think a bit of both. It’s pretty crazy being solo. In the band everything was split by three. Decisions were always split by three so there was always someone there keeping things in line whereas with me I worry I’ve lost perspective and I think “oh God, what if i’m writing absolute crap and I have no one to tell me”. But it’s also really enjoyable in that way because I get to make decision purely because they’re right for me. I have a lot more freedom and a lot more choice in that way.

Have you still collaborated with a few people for the EP?

I have. Four of the songs are co-produced by Oscar Key Sung who is also on the same record label as me, Two Bright Lakes, and we had a lot of fun with that. I wrote the songs but I wanted help with beatmaking and bringing a bit of his feel to the table. And then the last song, Let’s Go To The Beach, I actually co-produced with Sam Perry who plays for Architecture in Helsinki. That was a really fun song to make because I’m just starting out making more electronic music and that song is the most electronic on the EP. They put alot into that piece with me in making it danceable and what I really envisioned it to be. So, I did still collaborate and work with others along the way.

How did you move towards your RnB/Electronic sound?

I think I listen to a lot of music that is RnB and electronic influenced. More present people who are playing around now like AlunaGeorge, Pikachu and Jai Paul are that. I listen to that a lot and could hear the more soulful elements of their music coming through but I really loved the…I don’t know, there’s something about electronic music that is harsher. It doesn’t have the warmth that electronic music has and I really enjoyed adding that element to my music, especially after playing around with synthesizers a lot in the last couple of years and listening to a lot of synth music like College of Desire and ‘80s artists. I really wanted to bring those together. I’ve always listened to RnB growing up and I’ve always listened to country growing but synthesizers and electronic music is something that only came to me in the last five years. I was excited to bring those elements together and hearing other people do it, even older artists like Arthur Russell, I felt really inspired to mix it up and create something that brought together all my musical enjoyments.

[soundcloud width=”750″ height=”200″]https://soundcloud.com/banoffeeme/reign-down[/soundcloud]

Are there certain records that you keep returning to for inspiration?

Love Is Overtaking Me by Arthur Russell is a big one. I listen to that a lot. There are songs and areas that I go back to more than albums. There are quite a few Mariah Carey songs that I think are written brilliantly that I listen to again and again for inspiration. Aswell as late 90s, early 2000s RnB that included people like Ne-Yo and Mario. I think a lot of people think that it’s kind of easy, sell-out, pop/RnB but the production is amazing and the songwriting is really well done. So, I got back to that to remind myself that songwriting is important and a very big part of music to me to have a thought-through structure that goes with the lyrics and the instrumentation.

Have you found that working on your music in Melbourne and being around that scene has been inspiring?

Yeah, definitely. I think any city will be inspiring musically. The community has had a huge impact on the way I make music. Just working with such an array of musicians who make really interesting music like working with Nick Cousins since I was very young, like 14 until now has really helped me understand the instruments I’m using and more of the technical side of music. Nick taught me that you can love more organic sounding music like country music and folk and mix it with synthesizers and sequencers and put a beat to it and indulge in the two sides. Being a part of Two Bright Lakes has really helped me do that. If you listen to alot of the artists they mix a lot of genres together. They are not defined by one genre or one area of music and that’s really helped me.

A lot of overseas media and the moment are talking about how Australia is in this golden period for music. Are you noticing that?

Yeah, I think Australia is killing it at the moment and it’s really exciting to be a part of the music scene here. In Melbourne and Sydney and Brisbane, it’s really exciting to hear friends that have worked so hard, getting the appreciation they deserve. Like, watching Oscar Key Sung go up the ranks and seeing how internationally he’s doing so well and girls like Chela who’s now living in LA and being appreciated for her art and her hard work, that’s fantastic. These people really deserve it and whether it is that Australia is in the zone right now, I’m not sure it’s that we have gotten any better, I think that people are noticing there is some really great stuff going on here.

Are you finding it interesting to see when you release a song how many different places it goes?

It’s weird. It’s really weird. Yeah, I do find it interesting. It’s great. How the hell did people survive without the internet. I feel like I’m very much an internet artist. I don’t play live very often so the internet  has really helped me. You can go into SoundCloud and go into statistics and it shows you where your music is being made. I have more people listening to my songs in America than I do here and that weirds me out. I’m like, “I don’t know any of them”. They’re not listening to me because they feel like they have to because they’re my friends.

Are you excited to take the EP into the live arena?

Yeah, I’m looking forward to it. I must admit, I’m quite nervous to play, just because I’m quite shy. But I’m really looking forward to playing songs and saying, “this is on my EP and you can get it now”. Instead of having one or two singles in my set that people know. This is my first release and I’ve never been able to say “this is from my EP that you can get online”, so I’m excited.

Where’s the visual influence from Banoffee come from?

Me and Alice Glenn worked very closely on all the clips and it was really like a close collaboration between her and I deciding what we wanted to do visually. Each of the clips for me have an element of fun but also a hint of meaning towards what the song is about. The wigs and sunglasses in Got It were about the two narratives that Got It has which is showing people who are in their element and people who can celebrate something that they’ve worked hard to be good at and that’s sort of the clips that go on in the lenses. But the other part is realising that you don’t who you’re close to and that can feel like a shock or a bit of an injustice. And the wig and the glasses was part of trying to communicate that sense of disguise.

Banoffee’s debut EP is out on Friday.

 

BANOFFEE AUSTRALIAN EAST COAST TOUR:

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 10

BIGSOUND Music Conference, Brisbane QLD

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 19

Shebeen Bandroom, Melbourne VIC

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 20

Goodgod SmallClub, Sydney NSW

Fractures_Interview2

Fractures on Bigfoot, Hype Machine & the Melbourne Music Scene

Fractures_Interview

It’s been a big year for Melbourne-born FracturesAn EP released in July, internet success and a performance at Splendour in the Grass, made only bigger by his forthcoming EP launch shows and performances at BIGSOUND and LA music festival, Culture Collide. Though it hasn’t always been smooth sailing for Fractures (AKA Mark Zito). Late last year, in the midst of increasing success, Zito was involved in an accident that caused him to, somewhat ironically, fracture his neck. Six months’ recovery later, the multi-instrumentalist is back again, stronger than ever, fresh from his performance at Splendour and about to embark on his EP tour. We had a chat to him about his upcoming shows, musical influences and the truth about Bigfoot.

You had to cancel your debut show last year due to fracturing a vertebrae in your neck. How did the accident and subsequent recovery influence your music?

Initially it only stopped me making it. Purely because of the physical constraint of the situation I was in. Some slight mental boundaries in there too, but physical had already won the battle before they factored in. Ultimately, it gave me time to reflect on the songs I’d already written and how they sat side by side.

Basically, whether they complemented one another or not in some way and it resulted in me seeing that they didn’t necessarily. At least not all of them so I was able to make a more conscious effort to add to the catalogue from that point on with that in mind and I think I’ve stuck to it.

How have your rehearsals been going in preparation for your EP launch shows? Are you feeling confident?

I’ve got a good band behind me so that’ll rarely be an issue. Almost a case of us getting bored of the songs before the audience has a chance to. The EP shows won’t feature a vastly different set list to what I’ve played before at my previous shows, especially given that there have been only two of them in Melbourne at least.

So I feel I can afford to milk these tunes for a little while longer but there should be one or two newbies in there, and half of the set is unreleased as far as the audience is concerned anyhow. So yeah, confident.

EW compared you to Alt-J. How do you feel about comparisons like this?

I’ll take the comparison. They’re not a band I’ve listened to all that much but when people speak about them so glowingly most of the time then I’m not going to complain about being mentioned in the same sentence.

I suppose the comparisons serve me well in gaining a new audience more than anything – it’s not as though I like every artist I might be compared to but if someone else does and it brings them my way then I’m all for it.

The Melbourne music scene is particularly thriving. Do you feel you’ve benefited from it?

It’s dense. Truly dense. I’m not sure if I can give a solid yes or no to that answer but once you dip your toe in slightly it turns out it’s not as expansive as you might have thought. Everyone can be connected somehow which is definitely a positive for having access to creative people.

You’re playing at Culture Collide in LA later this year. Will this be your first time playing overseas?

Yup. First gig on foreign soil. Should be a laugh. I know very little about it but that doesn’t bother me one bit.

Are you surprised at how your music has spread internationally?

I’m still not totally convinced it has. Internet stats are one thing but until I set foot over there, play a show, and have more than 10 people turn up then I’ll still maintain my scepticism but hopefully I’m proven wrong. It’s still so early on in the piece that my expectations aren’t sky-high, but they’ll get there.

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/fractures-music/cadence[/soundcloud]

 

Your music has been doing the rounds on Hype Machine. Do you attribute this as an enabler of your music growing to a wider audience?

Without a doubt. You chart there and it’s pay day, figuratively, as far as streaming stats and the like are concerned. Get inside the top 10 and it goes a bit bananas for a few days which is nice but it doesn’t necessarily guarantee retention of interest.

As far as giving music a platform, mine in particular, it definitely put the spotlight on me, even for that short period, and gave me a more solid foundation on which to build.

What producers are you influenced by?

Ohhhh, none in particular. I don’t get too mired in the world of producers per se. I am a fan of Trentemøller, I’m not sure the influence is all too obvious with me though. None in particular come to mind.

Fractures_Interview_wacky

1. Would you rather be part of One Direction or Five Seconds of Summer?

Five Seconds of Summer. The homegrown aspect wins out – and they seem to actually play instruments live. As far as I can tell.

5s0s

2. If you could join one music act on stage during Splendour, who would it be?

Angus & Julia Stone and play blues solos over the top. Mash up, baby.

3. Favourite pizza topping?

Cheeeeeeeeeesssssseeeeeeeeee.

cheezy-pizza

4. If you were a box of cereal, what would you be and why?

Anything Home Brand, because I’m cheap and unreliable.

honeyfractures

5. Do you believe in Bigfoot?

I believe.


//Fractures – EP Launch 2014

FRI 8th AUG – The Vanguard – Sydney – Tickets

SAT 9th AUG – Northcote Social Club – Melbourne – SOLD OUT 

WED 13th AUG – Northcote Social Club – Melbourne – Tickets 

WED 10th SEP – BIGSOUND – Brisbane – Tickets 

THURS 16th OCT – Culture Collide – Los Angeles – Tickets 

 

montaigne_interview2

Montaigne on Michel de Montaigne, dragonflies and being a t-shirt and shorts kinda gal

Montaigne Interview_Fantastic wreck_I am not an end

You only have to look at the top of the Singles and Album Charts in the US to know Australian females are killing it at the moment. Sia’s sixth album, 1000 Forms of Fear is the number one album while Iggy Azalea is holding the number one single in the country for the eighth week in a row. 18 year-old singer/songwriter Montaigne may be slightly more like the former than the latter, but she is nonetheless further proof of the healthy state of the Australian music scene.

Sydneysider Jessica Cerro has only just released her second single, I Am Not An End, and already she’s been added to high rotation on Triple J and become a buzzworthy name on websites around the country even before the release of her debut EP, Life of Montaigne.

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/montaigne-music/i-am-not-an-end[/soundcloud]

Born from a diet of Owen Pallett, Arcade Fire, clouds and theatrics, Montaigne is crafting self-assured, pop-music with a grandiose far beyond her years. Speaking to the interns, Montaigne described her music as “Regina Spektor with the epicness of Coldplay”. The Coldplay reference comes from her first live encounter with the band whilst here on their Mylo Xyloto tour- a show she describes as “the best night of my life”.

She goes onto further cite her references as influences from Bjork to The National to Florence Welch and Marina and the Diamonds. This perhaps explains why her music sounds so epic for an 18 year-old singer who, two years ago, wasn’t sure if she wanted to be a musician.

In 2012, Cerro was a finalist on Triple J’s Unearthed High. While she didn’t win, she calls it a “blessing in disguise”. “I didn’t even know if I wanted to be a musician full time”, she said, continuing, “but now I am sure that’s exactly what I want to do for the rest of my life.”

She’s used the two years since to finish her studies, define her sound and find an image. “Everybody kept asking what my image was going to be and I wasn’t sure. I’m a t-shirt and shorts kinda girl”, she says. Since then she’s cut her hair off and found an image revolving around her “obsession of clouds”.

Both singles off Life of Montaigne, I’m A Fantastic Wreck and I Am Not An End have been picked up by Triple J. “It’s awesome Triple J and blogs are picking it up, it seems to be happening so quickly”, she says. Until recently Montaigne was managed by her Mum. She explains, “I’ve only just got a manager which is great because now I can go back to having a normal relationship with my Mum”.

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/montaigne-music/im-a-fantastic-wreck[/soundcloud]

Cerro sounds genuinely giddy about her success and confident in talking about her influences both sonic and sociological. She says, “I’m more influenced by concepts than sounds”. In particular, she is most influenced by French Renaissance writer, Michel De Montaigne, who was known for his depictions of the human-race. His most famous phrase, “Que sçay-je?” meaning literally ‘What Know I?’ comes across in Cerro’s songs as she takes on a very personal self-exploration, particularly on the self-deprecating yet triumphant, I’m A Fantastic Wreck.

However, Montaigne says that Michel De Montaigne’s theories are not the topic of her songs, rather just a notion. “He’s not a direct lyrical influence”, she says, “I just kinda want him to be attached to my music, so people think of my music kinda like that”.

The EP, which is due out this year, is described by Cerro as “a mix of everything…a mix of the two styles of the singes”. She “just hopes everybody likes it”.

montaigne_wacky

1. What is the best end to a movie?

“That’s hard. Lord of the Rings: The Return of the Kings… It’s really cute.”

2. If you had to re-record an entire album, what would it be?

“ Bjork- Post. I just love that record.”

3. Describe your music with one animal?

“Dragonfly.”

4. Do you believe Shakespeare wrote his own plays?

“Yeah, I reckon he did.”

5. Your favourite trend from your childhood?

“Definitely tamagotchi.”

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allday_2

Allday on R&B, women & vegan hot dogs

AlldayAllday (AKA Tom Gaynor) is the most hyped name in Australian hip-hop right now although it’s not Aussie hip-hop as you’ve heard it. On hearing Allday’s debut album, Startup Cult, it becomes clearly apparent that the young Melbourne emcee is inspired by rappers like Future, Drake and Yeezy rather than homegrown acts. As such he’s ushering in a new-age of Australian hip-hop; one based on youthful lyrics, northern-hemisphere beats and a ‘cult’ that has quickly formed around him. As a young artist, Allday has become somewhat of a master at social media. He’s amassed almost 100,000 likes on Facebook and 62,000 followers on Instagram. In celebration of his new album Startup Cult, he took a number of his fans on bus rides around Melbourne and Sydney to listen and chat about the new album.

Allday answered a few questions for the interns about what inspired the bus idea, his favourite R&B tracks at the moment and whether he would win a hot dog eating competition.

What inspired the “Startup Cult” bus idea?

At the moment with all the people messaging me it’s very difficult to reply to every fan so I thought if the quantity of fan interaction is decreasing, let’s improve the quality. At first I wanted to drive around with people 1 on 1 and play them the album but we settled on the idea of a bus. Next time I’m thinking a “booze cruise” around the harbour.

It sounds to us like your music sounds slightly more like American hip-hop than Aussie. Would you agree?

I think the line between Australian and American sounds is that Australian Hip Hop has branched off from 90s boom bap and developed in a certain way. I love and appreciate a great deal of Australian Hip Hop but my musical influence isn’t really rooted in Australian artists. I think it’s very cool Australia has its own sound, but I don’t really consider myself a part of that (beyond the accent).

You’ve built up an impressive following without having an album out yet. How important is social media in that?

Social media has been the foundation of everything for me so far. If Instagram and Facebook were to close down tomorrow I have no idea what I’d do. On the other hand, sometimes people overthink social media, I just try to be myself and I think people can sense honesty.

What have you done differently from the mixtape to the album? Do you think the album sounds more cohesive?

Well the album took a lot longer. I thought about what I wanted to communicate and how. Whereas on the mixtapes I would usually just find a beat or whatever and write a rap in 5 or 10 minutes. Then record it in 15 or 20 minutes and that would be a song. For instance, some songs like Sick Sad World or Julia Stiles (mixtape songs) would have about 30 minutes total work in them. When they got to 100,000 views or whatever I realized “wow, I would have done a better job if I knew this many people would listen to it.” So on the album, I tried to do a better job.

Is Right Now a good indication of what is to come on the album or are there some curve balls?

I think there’s some curve balls.

How is the tour going? Is the crowd reacting to the new songs well?

The tour just finished up, the new songs weren’t going amazingly actually but that always seems to happen with me. Maybe I need a bit of practise to perform them or something.

Name your five favourite hip-hop/RnB songs at the minute.

Partynextdoor – TBH

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/partyomo/partynextdoor-tbh[/soundcloud]

Sampha – Indecision

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/samphamusic/indecision[/soundcloud]

The Weeknd – Often

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/theweekndxo/the-weeknd-often[/soundcloud]

Jeremih – Fuck U All The Time

Justin Timberlake – Not A Bad Thing

^ Wow these are all RnB, guess I’m going through a phase at the moment.

wackyqs1. Would you be Jay Z, Beyonce or Solange in the elevator situation?

I don’t know their personal lives and I don’t want to weigh in on that really but I think I’d like to be Jay Z because I’m already a man and I don’t want to have to get used to a whole different set of genitalia.

2. Do you believe you could win a hot dog eating competition?

I’m a pretty fast eater. The fact that I’m a vegan really holds back my hot dog eating (for the rest of eternity). Vegan hot dogs though, I’m keen to race.

3. What’s your least favourite Instagram filter?

Wow, so many of them suck. Hefe.

4. Money has been left in the ATM. What do you do?

If I was 16, I’d take that money and be buying something terrible with it before you could say “lack of morals”. These days, I’d take it back into the bank and make sure the person got their money back.

5. What do you see in this inkblot?

That’s clearly a woman’s body right? Now I look like some sex-minded perve, damn.

inkblotAllday‘s debut LP Startup Cult is out now.

yeo2

Yeo on Pharrell, Keith Urban and Koopa Troopa

yeo

Melbourne producer/songwriter, Yeo, has been kicking around on the scene for a while. Since the release of his first single, Girl, off his forthcoming EP, Come Find Me, his audience has boomed. His second single, Kobe has continued that streak, amassing almost 50,000 plays on Soundcloud and delivering a video directed by MOOP JAW.

We spoke to Yeo midway through his Kobe single tour, a show that brings together his diverse, RnB styles with an all-encompassing visual experience.

How’d the first show go?

Ah it was insane. It was crazy. So unexpectedly awesome.

Has the liveshow changed since you started?

It has. New members is one of them. But we’ve condensed the show down to a two piece, added visuals and also just recently we’ve started piping the set up so there’s not big spaces between songs and making it a real show. Making it an engaging experience more so than just a bunch of dudes on stage playing music.

Are people responding well to new material?

Four or five of the songs in our set haven’t been put out yet. Majority of it is from older albums but there is a big chunk that is new and people don’t seem to notice. Or if I do mention accidentally on stage that we are playing a new song, they get excited. It’s pretty cool.

QQ_Yeo_1I suppose you’re at that enviable point in your career where people respond well to new songs rather than going for a bar break.

Nahh. That happens. I feel sorry for bands that have to put up with that.

When you were writing and producing the songs for Come Find Me did you feel like you were onto something with Kobe?

I didn’t. Kobe is the one that is the most poppy and catchiest but I don’t necessarily like it the best. I think Girl is really interesting and then the other two are really quite catchy. It’s hard to explain. I didn’t get the feeling at the time. I liked it but I didn’t think this is the single.

Do you find Come Find Me is quite eclectic or is there a common thread that runs through it?

For me personally there is always a common thread. To everyone else I think they listen to what I do and think every song sounds different. I can see that too. A lot of things are different from song to song but where they come from, say my heart or the feelings that I have, they are all from the same place.

QQ_Yeo_5

AA

Have you had a common influence since you started recording?

The influences definitely change all the time for me. I think a lot of the feeling, it makes sense when you put them in chronological order. When it comes to something like grief it’s followed by shock, followed by anger, followed by you know repairing yourself and then eventually happiness. It all makes sense in terms of that kind of thing. Talking external influences, I listen to a lot of different kinds of music, I read a lot of different books and I watch a lot of different movies.

Do you think inspiration comes from finding new instruments and new sounds?

Yeah definitely, everything I do is to not have a plan. I lock myself in a shed and play around with all the different musical toys I have. A lot of the time songs just form themselves.

Do you pull inspiration from obscure things like Nintendo?

I used to play video games a lot when I was young. I don’t keep up with the gaming trends these days but I still enjoy video games in general. But yeah It does come from obscure things. Anything from video games to the way the light reflects of a river. Sorry to sound wanky but that’s one of the things. Or how could it is in Melbourne in Winter when you wake up sometimes. Whatever.

I read that you have another EP ready for release after Come Find Me, is that still happening and is it a different kind of sound?

It’s probably a very natural progression from Come Find Me. Come Find Me has a lot of space, and dimension to it. The next one is a tighter, groove-based thing, possibly with a bit more emotion. Because the space has been taken away, it’s a little bit more confronting.

QQ_Yeo8
Do you have an album in the works?

I would love to do an album but I don’t think that I have the attention span nor does my audience. We’ll see. One day I would love to. A big concept one with massive story-lines and songs that run into eachother.

It sounds to me as if the visual output is just as important as the audible output for you. Is that true?

Recently it’s become that way. I think to standout from other musicians and acts you’ve really got to focus on the experience as a whole and realise that people need more than just their ears to be stimulated these days.

How’d the collaboration come up with MOOP JAW for the Kobe video?

Well my manager is actually really good friends with the director and the writer of the clip. He heard the song and he liked it so he said yes.

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Are you happy with the clip?

I’m so stoked, I’m really proud of the clip. It took a long time to come out because there were some details we had to work out. But when it came out everybody said to me it’s beautiful. And I was like, “yeah, I’m glad it came across that way”. That’s all we wanted to do. Make it a work that both Rhett and I were happy with.

How do you go about incorporating the visual into your live show?

We just have a projector and we turn the lights down so you can see the projector. That’s what a lot of bands do wrongly these days. They leave the lights up and you can barely see anything. It’s all about making the crowd feel less self-conscious and giving them something to focus on other than people.

Was there an artists that influenced you early on to be a musician?

Not particularly. There have been a few key artists in my life that have made me or inspired me. Mostly my peers, seeing what they do and how things can be done push me along. Pharrell was a big influence back when I was starting out. It was like, hey he’s just one guy with these ideas and he’s just putting them on record. It’s hard to nail down influences because there’s so many and they’re always changing.

QQ_YEO_6

Do you feel it’s a good time to be a self-made electronic artist?

Ahh. What it does is if there’s a lot of competition around, you just get better at what you do. You work hard. Sometimes, it’s a little bit disheartening when you see these young kids who have produced one song in their bedroom shoot to superstardom whereas there’s guys like me have been kicking it for nine years. But it’s all about the follow-up. If they do a track after that that’s just as good, I’ll shut the hell up because that’s rad.

Do you feel like taking a while is a good thing?

I definitely feel that. My character is very densely built now that I’ve been gigging around for so long. And I don’t get phased by flashy offers or big city lights. I know what I’m good at, I know what I’m not good at and I know what I need to get better at.

Kobe Single Tour:

FRI 6 JUNE – NORTHCOTE SOCIAL CLUB, MELBOURNE

SAT 14 JUNE – THE CAUSEWAY, PERTH

SAT 14 JUNE – LOST SOCIETY BAR, PERTH (DJ SET)

SUN 15 JUNE – INDI BAR, SCARBOROUGH

FRI 20 JUNE – UPSTAIRS BERESFORD, SYDNEY

SAT 21 JUNE – THE ARMIDALE CLUB, ARMIDALE

FRI 27 JUNE – ALHAMBRA, BRISBANE

SAT 28 JUNE – SOL BAR, MAROOCHYDORE

FRI 4 JULY – CATS @ ROCKET BAR, ADELAIDE

SAT 5 JULY – TRANSIT BAR, CANBERRA

THU 17 JULY – SCU UNI BAR, LISMORE

FRI 18 JULY – BEACH HOTEL, BYRON BAY

 

SAFIA3

SAFIA want to be brought back from the dead as a hologram & other things I learnt from our interview

SAFIA3

Halfway through their first ever National headline tour, SAFIA have taken Australia by storm. Continuing their success from their 2013 Groovin’ the Moo competition win, the Canberra trio, consisting of Ben Woolner, Michael Bell and Harry Sayers, have nearly sold out all their shows. With only two released songs to their name, Listen to Soul, Listen to Blues and Paranoia, Ghosts and other Sounds the result is a pretty mean feat. An achievement not lost on lead singer, Ben. I had a chat with him about their recent success.

“It’s nuts. I don’t get it. We’ve only put out two songs and people are paying for an hour of music that they essentially don’t know.”

Growing up and attending school together, Ben, Michael and Harry went through “a bunch of bands and phases.” Ben came from a rock background and then the trio formed a “pop punk band and then got influenced by the Australian prog scene with Cog and The Butterfly Effect kinda stuff.” They then moved onto heavier sounds, followed by a more indie route a la Kings of Leon. Ben states that once he “tried everything in the band scene”, he found it was good but became “limiting.” It was then that he explored electronic music which “had no limitations.”

“Even back when Skrillex first put out that song Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites and it was so foreign. And then from there, because (that song) was so in your face, I started going into underground electronic stuff and started really liking it.”

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The reception to SAFIA has been huge considering only two songs have been released, and it seems like their fans are gagging for more. “It’s crazy. It’s good. It feels like we’ve got a lot more we can do with releases. We can keep it going for a while even before an album.”

So is there an album in the works? It seems as if the boys are holding off for now, instead piling up songs “in hope of an album” and building their “profile to the stage where (they) can make a really, really good first album” without the danger of the tracks getting lost if they were to be released in an EP.

What can those people lucky enough to snag tickets to the sold-out shows expect to see?

“I think we pride ourself on having a really dynamic live show that goes up and down and has quiet moments mixed with really big, over the top moments. It kinda just goes everywhere. We try and go for the more theatrical, band show.”

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With only two songs currently known to the public, the majority of the shows will consist of new material. So how is the new material being received?

“Really good. A lot of the new stuff we’ve been playing for a while in sets and there is a lot of songs we know generally get received well by the crowd because of the general beats. A lot of the unreleased stuff is a tad more dancey than the two songs that are out. Instantly you can move to them and you don’t need to know the lyrics straight away.”

And can the crowd expect to hear any covers?

“We play one cover which we are hoping to release soon on live and then we do our remix of Tear it Down by The Ashton Shuffle.”

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/safia-music/the-aston-shuffle-tear-it-1[/soundcloud]

 

“We also cover Cavalier by James Vincent McMorrow.”

I enlighten Ben about my attendance to James Vincent’s concert in the Sydney Opera House during Vivid, to which he seemed to admit he was quite ready to drop everything and head to that instead.

“Ah so jealous! We were playing a show. I was like, ‘let’s cancel this and go to James Vincent!’ We do that song with our skin on it. I can’t wait to put it out because it gets super well-received at our live shows. He does go super high and we do it in the original key so I’ve gotta get up there as well.”

So can Ben hit dat falsetto James Vincent is so famous for?

“I can. I can. But I’ve gotta watch it with the partying. If I party too hard the night before it gets a bit grainier.”

I express that it’s really cool to see other artists doing covers of each other, giving the example of James Vincent McMorrow covering Higher Love and then SAFIA in turn covering James.

“It’s artist-inception. It’s a song within a song within a song.”

QQ4

It’s been half a year since I saw SAFIA for the first time at the Electronic Music Conference Spotlight show. Things have changed a bit since then. For one, according to Ben, it’s noticeable in the live shows that they’ve been ‘spending a lot of time writing’ as opposed to their early material which mainly consisted of ‘half-finished demos’ with ad-libbed vocals.

“Now, most of the songs are fully written. They’ve got specific parts and vocal backing tracks. It’s a lot more polished. Instead of playing from song-to-song, it’s now kind of like a show.”

During their March/April tour with Elizabeth Rose, SAFIA were given the news that they would be supporting Lorde on her April/May Australian tour.With only three weeks to prepare, Ben states that they were pressed for time to ‘get it all ready quick’.

“We were like, ‘ah, God!’ and rushing to organise our live set to get it perfect. You can’t get away with bad setup like you can in a small club.”

It was then that Lorde had to postpone the shows to July instead due to illness. Although it was a “disappointment when she postponed”, which Ben adds is completely understandable “because it gets exhausting doing all the touring”, SAFIA were then able to have a “month off to write.”

“It has been a blessing in disguise. We have a solid set that we are happy with now.”

Praise the Lorde.

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The boys have come so far since being chosen as the Triple J Unearthed band for Canberra last year. In their short rise to prominency they’ve picked up a few tips.

“Just keep working super hard and writing. Write and continue to build the craft and don’t put all your money on one song. It’s a long process. We’ve still got a long way to go. It’s not an overnight thing. I remember Harley (Flume)’s first demo was sent into FBi in 2008 or something. So, get as much help as you can.”

Ben states that one thing that helped them in the beginning was to have someone to manage them and give them a “perspective of what to release.”

“You can make the music but then a lot of musicians don’t know the next steps. It’s not as simple as just putting it online. Sometimes it is, if it’s an amazing tune but there’s a lot that goes into that. Doing your research and asking around, asking bands in your hometown. We’re more than happy to answer people on Facebook. It’s a big long process to get a song released and on radio.”

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It seems that with there being more SAFIA demand than supply, there isn’t a shortage of remixes floating around to fill the gaps between releases. Ben seems to be quite impartial to a favourite.

“They’re all good in their own way. We select all our remixes because we’re independent so we organise with our management ourself what we want the package to be.The one I still love is the Indian Summer one of ‘Listen To Soul’. It’s a cool take on it.”

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/safia-music/listen-to-soul-listen-to-1[/soundcloud]

“There’s also a Leaderboy one which is a cool down-tempo, techno thing.”

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/safia-music/listen-to-soul-listen-to[/soundcloud]

“I think one of the coolest ones was before we’d even organised a package for ‘Listen To Soul’ and this guy had sent through to our inbox like a bootleg. To see people sending bootlegs of our song was crazy. Now he’s supporting us. So from just sending it to us, saying ‘check out my bootleg’, it’s gone from there. He’s absolutely killing it on all the shows.”

Yet another way to break into the industry.

“It’s so easy to get in contact with anyone. Just ask around.”

SAFIA – “Paranoia, Ghosts & Other Sounds” Tour 2014
SAT 24/05 – Transit Bar – Canberra, ACT
FRI 30/05 – The Beach Hotel – Byron Bay, NSW
SAT 31/05 – Alhambra Lounge, Brisbane, QLD
THU 05/06 – DK Pool Club @ CSU – Bathurst, NSW
FRI 06/06 – Shebeen – Melbourne, VIC 
SAT 14/06 – Spectrum – Sydney, NSW SOLD OUT 
SUN 15/06 – RAD – Wollongong, NSW SOLD OUT 
FRI 20/06 – Mojo’s Bar – Fremantle, WA SOLD OUT 
SAT 21/06 – Pirie & Co Social Club – Adelaide, SA: Tickets
SAT 28/06 – River Sessions – Mackay, QLD: Tickets

bigscary2

Big Scary on the Aussie invasion overseas, hip-hop and the perils of road trippin’

Kermit Cintron vs Walter Mathysse

 It may seem hard to picture in Australia but the Australian invasion in America right now is fiercer than ever. This month already, Iggy Azalea has entered the top 10 on the US charts, Courtney Barnett has played Jimmy Fallon and boy band Five Seconds of Summer have stormed the charts with their debut single. In addition to that, Elizabeth Rose, Flume, Jagwar Ma, The Preatures and Anna Lunoe have been touring the country, impressing widespread crowds.

Big Scary are currently touring the country with Indie-Electronic artist Say Hi, contributing to the mass attention directed at musicians downunder. The Melbourne pair consisting of Tom and Joe have moved from LA to New York where they played two shows.

They’re signed to Barsuk records which is the home of artists like Death Cab For Cutie and Phantogram and have just released their sophomore album Not Art in America.
Tom spoke to us from a van touring from New York to Philadelphia. Despite being plagued by terrible weather and a minor car accident, he managed to chat us through the overseas tour, hip-hop and re-designing the live shows with a smaller band.

the(in)terns: How did the show go in New York?

Tom: It was awesome actually, really good. It’s just a really cool venue with a lot of vibe and we felt really relaxed.

How have the shows been going in the US overall?

Generally really good. I think we’re a bit surprised at how well we’ve been doing but more in our own capacity as performers. I thought I would’ve got sick and lost my voice but I’m still hanging in there. I think we’re happy about that and we definitely haven’t had any train wreck shows. Some have been better than others, but it’s been really good so far.

Kermit Cintron vs Walter Mathysse

Is it odd going through the whole album release again overseas?

It kind of is. It’s not odd it’s more, we know the songs so well. So it’s different like that. When we were touring with them back home in Australia they were kind of fresh and new to us so there was a nervousness about playing them along with the excitement of doing something new. Now, we have performed them plenty but we also don’t have that nervousness like “am I going to remember what to play in this part” or “what happens here or there”. It’s more relaxing and we can concentrate on the performance on the night which has been really cool.

Is this your first time touring in the US?

I guess as a proper tour, yeah. We’ve come over and done CMJ and South by Southwest before and a few little showcase shows and so we’ve been to New York and LA but this time we’ve just driven from West coast to East coast then down South before we head back West. It’s a completely different thing really.

Have the songs developed in the live arena since the release of Not Art?

Absolutely. I think more out of necessity. Back home we had two other band members to help us out with new songs but over here we couldn’t afford to bring them over. We were thinking we would do it over here as a two piece but just by chance it worked out that Say Hi was available and his album release cycle was going to line up. The tour together was looking good and along with that he was willing to learn a few songs and play along during our set. We’ve had to strip the songs back a bit and kind of re-interpret them in different parts. Back in Australia we had the other guys doing quite technical things with more instruments involved but with Eric we only had a few days where he had to learn everything and we didn’t want him doing too much. We didn’t want him playing three different keyboards so we re-interpreted just for him to play on a bass guitar. I think we’ve been quite successful though.

Is it exciting to come overseas and see rooms fill up on the other side of the world?

Yeah absolutely. Two years ago we played the Mercury Lounge and it was pretty empty, but last night we had a full room. Having been there before, it struck us as something pretty cool. We’ve played a string of shows rights through the country. Some shows have been bigger than others but every show there’s been at least a fan or a couple of fans just there to see us. It’s cool that we can make music in Melbourne, Australia and someone overseas has heard us and loves the music enough to want to pay money again just to see us.

Are you finding you’re encountering lots of Australians over in the US?

Yeah. I guess it’s like even when you’re travelling you tend to bump into Australians wherever you go. It was nice to bump into Courtney [Barnett] and her guys. We toured together back home and so that’s how that friendship started. She’s doing so well over here so it was cool to see them and give them a hug before they headed off to the UK.

[Tom interrupts the interview]

Sorry, this weather is insane. It’s seems to be getting worse and worse. Jo just got out of the van because this guy just pulled up and slammed his door into the van.

Is everything okay?

Yeah, Jo is inspecting the damage. Sorry to interrupt.

How did it all come together with Barsuk records?

It’s something that initially started from connections we built from our early trips in 2012. We made a really good connection with a music lawyer based just outside of New York and once we got him on board he started working on getting us out there and doing his thing amongst the labels out of our sights. It was handled by a manager and we were back home. And then we got an email through that Barsuk had heard the album and loved it and were keen to do something with it.

Are you writing and recording over here?

We had every intention to. Jo and I had a writing session a few weeks ago and we had a bunch of cool ideas so I bought my iPad over and put GarageBand on it. But time just seems to be swallowed up on the road.

Are you finding it’s harder to break the US than it was in Australia?

It’s hard to tell. Nothing ever really happens as suddenly as it appears on the outside. It might seem from someone watching us on the outside that this has happened quickly but it’s never really the case. Jo and I have been playing together for seven or eight years so even in Australia we’re still an up and coming band even though we’ve been playing together for that long. Over here it’s kinda the same. It’s a slow but steady thing for us. Things are definitely moving in the right direction and slowly which I think is a healthy thing. The Barsuk guys are in tune with that. They want to do things organically and do things when the time is right. It’s a long term thing and it has to be for it to work.

I wanted to know if you actually think Hip-Hop sucked in 2013, as alluded to on Not Art?

That tracks actually a reference to another similarly named track. It’s a nod of the hat to an artist who influenced our sound on the Not Art record. It’s not a reprint action of our feelings towards hip-hop. Hip-hop production was a really big influence on the sound of the album and how we approached recording and arranging. It’s definitely not how we feel. Hip-hop has been a new discovery for me personally and I think it’s the most exciting genre in terms of production.

I thought the drum loop on Luck Now was reminiscent of that sentiment. Were you trialling new production techniques on the record?

Yeah absolutely. Production is something I’ve been getting into and we were keen to try new things. When the album was being made we had a whole lot less time together to play because of other commitments. And so it had to be made in a different way than the first record. We didn’t have the same time to write and then go into a studio. We did it on the fly.

Gig information can be found through their website

lizzierose

Elizabeth Rose on New York, Lady Gaga comparisons and the new album

Kermit Cintron vs Walter Mathysse

At just 22, Australia’s own Elizabeth Rose is as audacious as they come. Making her headline debut in New York, she took to the stage at the Mercury Lounge, just down the road to the iconic Katz’s Deli. Unlike the mammoth pastrami sandwiches Katz’s is so famous for, Rose is a petite performer. Petite, however, is no description of her show.

Playing in front of a small but highly receptive crowd, Rose was a valiant performer. Working her way through songs from the EP, she had the crowd dancing in seconds. At just 2 EPs, it’s a testament to the young artist that she was able to hold the attention of a crowd largely unbeknownst to her music.

The triple hit of Sensibility, her cover of Rhythm of the Night and The Good Life, proved the strength of her back catalogue. The best part about watching her is it looks like she knows it too. She often moves away from her keyboard to face the crowd front-on and throws some dance moves Solange would be proud of.

While her stage demeanour is confident, off-stage Elizabeth Rose presents a different side. She’s softly-spoken and polite yet talks knowledgeably about modern RnB and the sound she’s channelling.

the interns sat down with Rose in a dodgy Mexican cafe in the Lower East Side just before her New York headline to chat Lady Gaga comparisons, YouTube comments and the impending album.

I saw that you were working with Sinden and TokiMonsta. How did those sessions go?

Elizabeth Rose: Yeah they went well. That was in LA last week. The session with TokiMonsta was really good. I met up with her last time. She recently did a remix for me for my single Sensibility. The session with Sinden went well as well. It’s still very early stages.

Is the album starting to take shape?

Yeah. I’ve written about 3/5 of it. I know what sound I want.

Are you finding its a different process from writing the two EPs?

Yeah definitely. It’s a lot more rushed, doing it all while the EPs still doing well. This time around I’m focussing on getting melody and chord progression down rather than worrying too much about details of production. It’s kind of helping- we get through the demos quicker. It’s hard because I usually do the instrumentation first- I do the whole song and then I do the bass-line and then I come back and write the melody and lyrics. But it’s been really refreshing to do it the other way.

Have you found after the good life did so well that you were surprised and thought, oh wow, now I have to get back to work?

Yeah it was really surprising. I was really shocked at how well received The Good Life was. Mostly from Triple J. They really supported it. It’s been great. Since that single everything’s just been gradually building.

How did you find the Australian tour last month?

Yeah the tour was really good. It sold out in Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney. I’ve never done that before so it’s really exciting. Now it’s this next phase where I think “ok I’ve gotta buckle down and put some hard work in for this album”.

Did you enjoy the response to your cover of Rhythm of the Night?

It was really cool. I was worried because so many people say the nastiest things on YouTube. If they don’t like it they’ll rip it apart. But yeah most of it has been positive. The only negative comment was that I need to get more sun.

Do you read most of those comments?

Yeah. I’m sensitive. But someone wrote as a reply to that person, “it’s called a studio tan you arsehole” [laughs]

How was the show in LA?

Yeah it was good. We had a few technical problems but the crowd was into it. People were calling out for me to play Sensibility which was really cool. I thought no one would know that song at the show but it was a really good turn-out. I’m looking forward to tonight [in New York].

Seeing you’re now in a huge music hub, What’s your classic New York song?

I’d say something by Frank Sinatra.

What sort of expectation do you have when you play a show overseas?

I think when I’m overseas that nobody will turn up. It’s starting all over again, you feel like you’re all the way back at the bottom but it’s good to be surprised.

Did it seem like the road of starting out in Australia to selling-out venues was slow or quick?

Yeah it was slow. Slow and gradual. I’m happy that it took time thought because a lot has happened over the last few years- experiencing playing a festival for the first time, releasing an EP for the first time. It felt like the right pace for me. I feel quite comfortable with the way everything’s panned out. If it was happening too quickly i think I’d be quite anxious about it.

How did recording and writing change between the two EPs?

It changed quite drastically. I was in a totally different headspace for my first EP. It wasn’t really me having a solid concept it was more “here’s a bunch of songs I wrote, I wanna release something, let’s do this”. That one sounds a lot different to the second one because I didn’t really put much thought into it. With the second EP, I had a sound and a concept for it, so it felt like this one had a stronger feel to it. But also my writing has developed as well. Constantly writing has really strengthened that muscle. I’ve found the sound that I like now.

What about the live shows, do you enjoy having more material to play with?

Yeah, I love playing gigs now. I’m going to try and start playing some new new stuff soon so I’m really excited about that. Hopefully when I get back maybe I’ll play some shows with new songs, maybe if I get them ready in time. It’s really exciting to play new stuff and go “what do you think of this?”

Is there anything that’s influenced the direction you’ve gone in with your new material?

Nothing really new. It’s a progression on from the EP where I’ve taken on a bit more RnB. I always am inspired by the music I’ve grown up to like Brandy and Missy Elliot and all those really cool RnB artists. That’s always going to stay with me. Recently, I’ve been listening to some more experimental electronic music, some minimal techno.

I’ve noticed FKA twigs as well. Are you trying to find your own niche inside the RnB genre?

Yeah. I’m not consciously striving for it. I don’t really try and write anything, it’s just what I would like to listen to. I don’t have a sound in mind that I want to make it sound like. It’s just if it sounds good to me in the studio, I’ll go with.

Have you had any songs that you love in the studio and then listen to it with a collection of others and think it doesn’t fit?

Yeah that happened recently with a demo I wrote. It kind of has more of that ’90s pop feel with melody. It reminds me of that song by Olive. I was like, “shit, I’ve written something that doesn’t fit”.

How was your last trip to America?

It was good. I played six shows. It was a bit rushed and hit n miss every show. The venues were just like one fold-back speaker. But I got good feedback from it. I did a club show at the end which was great. I feel like I fit a club scene rather than a live band venue. This time around it’s going to be different. That time was really to get the word out about my music and this time I have the single out and plenty of remixes have been done which helps spread the word.

Have you found that international blogs have helped you overseas?

Definitely. I can’t believe this little trail that you leave. The internet is weird.

Do you like releasing a song and seeing how it’s received and where it’s taken?

Yeah. The TokiMonsta remix of Sensibility actually helped a lot. It’s created a lot of hype.

[soundcloud]https://soundcloud.com/elizabethrose/sensibility-tokimonsta-remix[/soundcloud]

Do you ever read a review of somebody writing about your music that says it sounds like something that you disagree with?

Everybody compares everything to anything these days. Like Spotify says listen to this, if you like that. I’ve read things in the past where Lady Gaga was mentioned and I was like “I don’t think so, you were at the wrong show”.

Are you writing with any Australian producers for the album?

I’d like to and I have a lot of people I can think of but nothing’s locked down yet.

Do you have a release date in mind?

I don’t know yet. I’d say sometime next year.

Do you have any writing sessions set for London?

Yeah. I’m trying to get in contact with Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs.

What’s the thought process behind choosing to go overseas?

I don’t feel like this year would be appropriate to move overseas but I’ve already started to think about next year. You can only do so much in Australia. After coming back from America last year, to see how big the market is and how many radio stations there are, it’s just so much bigger. I’m sure in Europe I’ll find that too. You’ve got to go where the music is buzzing, you can’t stay at home when there’s stuff happening overseas. I want to be there to be in it. Collaborations are so much easier overseas.

 

After America, Elizabeth Rose heads to Canada and then onwards to Europe. For all the details, click here. 

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